Meet Pixel Sprite!

Hi to all! Today we have for you a new interview, this time we have stolen some time to our artist Pixel Sprite, one of the artists that has participated in the designs for our cool stuff in the shop . Enjoy it and have a nice Monday!

Hi Pixel Sprite :)
Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?
I’m a hobby artist.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
It was years ago but I can’t really remember. Circumstantial evidence says late ’07. As for how, I think it was that I read about GIMP on a ‘cool free programs’ list and it snowballed from there.

What is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting? or Do you still prefer traditional means, if so, why?
I have a dislike of unnecessarily wasting things, like art supplies. Wearing down pencils and using up paper. Using up disk space or just not saving things that aren’t turning out nicely is far more comfortable to me. I’d still like to be good with some traditional media at some point.

krita_squirrel_by_pixelspriteart-d63juwe

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
The first open-source community I was really aware of was Blender’s, back in the time of 2.48. I generally find them to be very helpful even without directly interacting with them.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
So far I’ve only been testing and commenting on the Windows version of Krita.

How did you find out about Krita?
I found out about Krita while occasionally checking David Revoy’s blog.

What was your first take on it?
First time reading about Krita: “I think I want to like this program.” (That was before Krita was usable on Windows.)
First time using Krita: “So many brushes! So many brush settings that I don’t know what they do!”

What do you love about Krita?
That it’s the best all-around open-source graphics program and that it makes me want to get better at painting so I can use it better.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
I think Krita is awesome as-is and I’ll cheer for any further improvement. That said, I can’t tell you how excited I am for the animation GSoC project! I really hope that gets to be in a usable form. As for hate, it’s not so much hate as that I get sad when something breaks. Krita, at least when it comes to Windows, seems to like keeping its developers on their toes.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
It has image manipulation capacities, unlike MyPaint, which is great for small (and not-so-small) fixes and it is far more fun to paint with than GIMP. Krita also starts with a ‘K'; the advantage of this should be obvious. That or I’m biased.

If you had to pick one favourite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
That would have to be the picture I did in celebration of Mega Man being announced as a character in the next Super Smash Bros. game.

super_smash_bros__mega_man_by_pixelspriteart-d68xz7z

What is it that you like about it? What brushes did you use in it?
I like that it came out as well as it did. It showed me what I could do if I sat down and really put my mind (and time) into a piece. For brushes I mainly used Basic_paint_05 and Basic_paint_25 set to build up mode along with a thin oval brush that had its rotation set to the drawing angle.

If you want to know more about him don’t forget to visit his DeviantArt!

The muses preset pack

Last time, we went through the options for the versatile and expressive hairy brushes. This time, we’ll discuss the brush set I’ve created for the “Muses” training DVD. Creating the brush set has been an enriching experience. Together with David Revoy and Timothee Giet, we created a standard for brush sets — and we have also created a SVG library with modular vector icons that are easy to adapt and use.  Check out Vasco Basque’s brush set, too.

So, without further ado: the Krita Training Vol.2: Muses Brush Set is here! The DVD is coming along nicely, too, and we hope to go into production soon.
Krita makes it really easy to create brush presets and if we don’t take care, we’ll create hundreds of presets. Managing so many presets is rather more difficult than 42, the number of presets of this pack. It pays to be selective!

This pack cover the basic necessities for the most painting projects. The set I created for  “Muses” was created made to complement the default set and also to be compatible with another packs, like David Revoy’s pack. Although both packs have some things in common, I think that they complement each other very well. Each has some functionality that isn’t present in the other.

The Muses Pack focuses on providing a rich and varied painting experience with a traditional look.

The set is designed for being used with tablet. It’s not necessary to have a tablet but I don’t recommend using a mouse because some presets can work in a unexpected ways because they use sensors like pressure or tilt. For the best experience, use a tablet that has tilt since  some presets use the “Ascension” parameter.

Contents of the set:

The colors of the squares are only for differentiating the parts,  they don’t have nothing to be with the colour coding we designed for distinguishing the presets.

Sketching:

This first part of the set covers the sketching and dry techniques phases like pencil, charcoal and hard pastel. Usually you’d use these presets in black and white, but the advantage of the digital painting is that with only one preset you can still use all the colors you want, for instance to simulate the effect of color pencils.

Digital:
This part of the set covers the most common presets that you need for digital painting. The classic round brushes with a good velocity in bigger sizes, smooth contour, squared… The illustration of below, for example, makes an extensive use of the squared brush for creating the structures of the mountain. After that, you will have to do a detailing finish, of course, but is a fast way for delimiting the contours.

Personally, I use these presets all the time

.

Ink & Fx:
In principle, this presets aren’t for inking comics (for that see the presets created by Timothee Giet), they are for doing studies or fast sketches.
We can emulate the markers technique very easily.

Oils & water:
I use this presets for creating the brushstrokes of wet paint, for giving the painting the look and feel of oil paint and gouache. They create expressive effects and they are fast but I don’t recommend the using them at really big sizes: you can easily saturate the resources of even a beefy computer. They use the “ascension” sensor for the color-rate.

Blender:
This presets mix the color that is applied in the canvas. They are quite explanatory in themselves.

Texturing:
This presets are used for fill big parts of the image with varied shapes like leaves, clouds, etc. They simulate effects that will take a lot of time painting it directly with normal round brush, saving us a lot of time that can be spent on places where we need manual detailing.

Hair Brush Pack Bonus:
If you have installed “Hairy presets set” you can create brush strokes where you can see a pattern of lines that simulate the hairs of the brush. Read my first post for all the details.

Download

The brushkit ZIP can be downloaded here : http://goo.gl/j4vpft
It should be compatible with 2.7 and 2.8dev
License :  the brushkit itself and thumbnails is released under the WTFPL 2.0  (compatible with Public Domain and CC-0 ).

Install

Unzip the downloaded zip , and paste the two folders ‘brushes’ and ‘paintoppreset’ into your Krita user preference directory. Under Mint 14 KDE, the Krita pref are located here : /home/<username>/.kde/share/apps/krita/.
On Windows, it will be c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\krita or c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\krita.

Interview with César Tellez!

Here we are again with more interviews for you! This time we have for you a conversation with César Tellez, he is Mexican and he has been a member of our artist community for a long time and now he has collaborated with us! His artwork will appear in the new coming products of our shop. Thanks to him and enjoy the interview!

Hi César,
Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?

Together with some friends, we have just started making digital art professionally. And we’ve been doing comics as a hobby.

When did you start with digital painting?
About 4 years ago, when I started to be a regular user of Kubuntu. In those days I bought my first graphic tablet and I started to search for tools for working with digital art in Linux based systems.

How was your first take on it?
Well, I was used to use the programs of that famous company that makes proprietary graphics software. My first attempt was with GIMP, and getting used to it wasn’t hard. Maybe it was a little irritating to work with all the separate windows, but bit by bit I got used to ti.  Eventually I discovered MyPaint, and that was a lot easier for me in a lot of ways.

Would you prefer digital painting or traditional?
I still prefer traditional painting and if the modern publishing industry would make it possible, I would exclusively work in the traditional way. But  it is more practical,  more productive to paint digitally. Anyway,  you can obtain the same effects with both methods, so it will always depend on the circumstances of each job and on the artist in particular.

How did you get in Open Source Communities?
It was almost at the same time that I started to use free software all the time, as immediately I started to find compatibility problems, system collapses and all those lovely issues. So I understood the need to be in contact with other users via forums and blogs almost immediately.

What do you think about Open Source communities?
There are all kinds of members, as it occurs in all the communities on line, but i have always been fortunate to find very kind and cooperative people.

Did you contribute to any FOSS project?
No, this will be the first time and I do it with pleasure

MiniKampfMinimal(1)

How did you find Krita?
At the moment of experimenting with open source apps. I tried Krita since the version 1.6.3, which wasn’t usable for me, but even back then, it seemed a promising program.

How was your first take on it?
Well. 1.6.3 and 2.0 gave me huge headaches, for the slowness, crashes and the limited file format support. It was difficult, but when 2.3  was released it turned almost overnight into my favorite tool.

What is the thing you like the most about Krita?
In the first place, that is a very flexible program, its configurability makes it very convenient to adapt to the type of technique or result wanted. Then its variety of brushes is very useful, as is the fact that each painting engine has a lot of configuration options.
It is  also what I call a “direct” app: it has filters, selections and other features that are there and can be used for photo editing or general treatment of the image, but don’t disturb the work for drawing, they are there but don’t  impede the concentration when painting.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita?
Maybe its resource consumption, it’s the only thing that doesn’t allows the position of Krita in the most popular digital art apps, apart there is that limitations of using a based in Linux system or the uncomfortable thing of a dual-boot

Something you hate?
Not really, except for the sudden closures of the app, but this occurs almost only in the test versions.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
Together with MyPaint, it comes closest to painting on a normal sheet of paper, it’s very comfortable with regard to its painting tools, but there are also these little options that you can find in photo editing programs that sometimes you need for working.

What brushes did you use?
I did the sketch in a paper sheet and then scanned it. The coloring process was done with pixel brushes with the maximum opacity, to make easier the application of color (task that regularly I start for solid colors with the fill tool). For the lights and shadows i used the blur brush, sometimes with textures, that, i have to say, that is a very interesting tool that Krita offers.

Thank you so much for this interview César, has been a pleasure :)

Hope you all enjoyed it!

 

Expressive painting with Hairy presets

Hi!

Ramon Miranda here! Let’s talk about Krita brush sets. The default set is big, not huge… But certainly big enough so you can get lost easily if you don’t spend a lot of time investigating. But if you dig deep enough, and explore the huge number of options, you’ll find some real gems. So lets see what i have discovered about one type of brushes: the hairy brushes.

The Default Hairy Brush Set:

After a some thorough and productive testing time, I got to a point where I managed to get a predictable and stable performance out of the hairy brushes. the hairy brushes can be very fast when you tweak some values, and that makes them more interesting.

The current set is a very good starting point but I felt I could improve on it. Read on for what I did – and a sneak preview of the Muses Painting with Krita DVD (which is getting very close now!)

 

The Muses Hairy Brush Set:

For starters:
Let’s change the painting mode from Wash to Build-up and link the opacity to the pressure curve sensor. Now we’ve got something that quite useful for expressive painting, but not for a realistic style.
Let’s also improve the icons we use a bit. Check out http://community.kde.org/Krita/Brushes_Preset_Preview for ongoing to work to coordinate the icons for Krita preset packs!

Next: advanced options:

  • Anti-aliasing: I haven´t seen a significant negative impact on performance and the quality improves a bit at 100% zoom level, so I’ve turned this on for all brushes.

  • Most of them use Bristle options/Mouse Pressure. This parameter uses the speed of the brushtroke to increase the size. I found it interesting, because we can make more detailed things as we paint slower.

  • All of them use a bit of Shear parameter to avoid the “superstraight” effect on bristles

  • Also some of these new presets use the Ascension with a not common ramp. This ramp is useful to constrain the amount of degrees you can rotate your hand before the brush start to rotate and covers the Left and Right rotation. You only have to modify the corners points to make this behavior more sensitive.


Contents of the Hairy Brush Pack

Contents:There are 6 presets that can be clearly identified. I designed them to be usable not just with a tablet, but also with a mouse – and still keep most of the appearance of a brushtroke. The description is for generic use, don’t limit yourself!

Hairy_Details: An easy to use detailing brush. You can see how the size changes if you go faster. Combined with different pressures and speed you get a lot of variety in your brushtrokes. Great to create edges and little details with slow speed.

Hairy_Large: To make backgrounds and cover large areas. It uses “ascension” to make it more versatile.

Hairy_Special_Blender: Not a common blender! It “paints”, but only with the color that is below the direct contact point of the stylus: it smears that color around using the opacity controlled by pressure. Sounds weird? Just give it a try!
The hairy special blender uses the “ascension” feature to make it more random and versatile. As you change the wrist angle we change the “grainy” direction so we can create “rare” patterns if we want. You’ll need a tablet that support tilt to experience the feature, of course.
If you apply low pressure, you’ll achieve a really nice kind of blending with a nice, soft grainy effect.

Hairy_Squared: This is a Squared Type brush. It can be use as a generic brush for mid size areas. And with not too much effects on parameters to make it controllable with a good predictable result like a classical bristle brush.

Hairy_Tapered: Creates a tapered brushtroke. You’ll get the best results if you combine pressure with a fast, “gestured” stroke. Moving slowly makes it usable for details, like edges. Low pressure but fast movement is useful to cover mid size areas like a glazing with semi translucent brushtrokes.

Hairy_Texture: Creates a textured look – a bit like a sponge. The user can control this effect with bristle options/random offset. Be careful with this value. Bigger values can decrease performance – but still fun to experiment with.
You can modify the Density parameter on the Brush nib to make the “spider-web” look less visible. The “density” controls the amount of the brush visible parts. Another tweak: you can vary the “density” bar on the bristle options/density

How to install:

Download

The brushkit ZIP can be downloaded here.
The brush set is compatible with Krita 2.7 and the current 2.8 development branch.

License :  the brushkit itself and thumbnails is released under the WTFPL 2.0  ( compatible Public Domain and CC-0 ).

Install

Unzip the downloaded zip , and paste the files into your Krita user preference directory. On Linux, the Krita preferences are located here :  /home//.kde/share/apps/krita/paintoppresets

Muses: Painting with Krita DVD
Special pre-order price including shipping and V.A.T: €27.50

David Revoy publish his 3rd Brush Kit

Yesterday, David Revoy presented his new and 3rd brush kit for Krita. Thanks to him for his constant collaboration!
He has post a complete guide where you can find how to use, download and install it.
He has developed a consistent work, creating new thumbnails with standard backgrounds, composition and colors, with the goal to merge into the main version. So, don’t be surprise if you find some of his brushes in Krita default brushes.

Enjoy it!

In conversation with Elena

Hello readers, today we are sharing a short interview with Elena, from Italy, who is a Computer Engineer by profession and a painter by hobby. She is learning anatomy at present and she is loaded with an amazing spirit to learn more. She is also collaborating with us for the Krita Shop on zazzle. Click on “read more” to read the entire conversation with this amazing budding artist!

Hi Elena, Would you like to tell us something about yourself?
I’m not very good at painting, I’m learning anatomy but I prefer to publish only simple things since half good/half bad anatomy falls easily in the uncanny valley ^^’
That sounds great. We look forward to you sharing those works!

Now, how would you define the importance of painting in your daily life?
Painting is a big part of my life but is only a hobby, a “serious” hobby in the last 2 years.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I was a preschooler and my father was kind enough to let me use his computer, a commodore 64 if I remember correctly.

What is it that makes you choose digital over traditional painting?
It’s cheaper and less time consuming.

Short yet very precise! So, how did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
During the first year of university we used FreeBSD, the next year I began to use Ubuntu and frequent the Italian forum. My opinion about them is generally positive.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
I only did this brush set for MyPaint. http://browse.deviantart.com/art/Brushes-for-mypaint-281981370

How did you find out about Krita?
I watched this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lyLPZDVdQiQ .

What was your first take on it?
After buying a new graphic tablet I decided to try it, unfortunately working with Krita was too much for my old laptop.

 What do you love about Krita?
It’s the right tool for what I want to do; the interface is functional and not distracting.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you hate?
Hate is such a strong word… Sometimes it’s slow with big images and/or big brushes.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
I mainly use Mypaint, I spend a big portion of my free time doodling with the pencil brushes but when I have a specific idea I prefer Krita; I make a lot of errors, making corrections in Krita is faster and for a final touch I love the color smudge brush with the smearing option. *_* I have never seen something similar in others open source programs.

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be? What brushes did you use?           
OK, I said “hate is a strong word” but I hate all of my works. XD I still don’t have the technical skills to draw exactly what I want. Maybe I don’t know what I really want to draw, maybe I shall always been unsatisfied. And that’s good. :) I want to improve myself and be a better artist.
I don’t have a favorite, above is the last work done with Krita. I used a lot of brushes for this, I still can’t choose what is better for my paintings.

I appreciate your spirit Elena!
It was a pleasure interviewing you. Hope you enjoyed this talk as much as I did! :)

Thank you for this opportunity, and for your work. Even if art is only a hobby for me, after a day of working, it makes me happy to take some time and draw; some days a pencil is enough, sometimes I need something more. So… Thank you, again. :)

Pleasure is all ours. Hope Krita continues to be your friend while learning and later. :)

You can check out more of her artworks on deviant here.

Check out the new cool merchandise!

Hi to all!

Here we are again with new products in the webshop. Now we have for you pillows, t-shirts, laptop sleeves… and more!
This time we had the collaboration of Tago Franceschi, Coyau and Nayobe Millis (our youngest artist), thanks to all of them to allow us to make great stuff with their artworks! You can see all the products on the Kritashop.

Here are some photos of the new products, enjoy it and share your love for Krita!

Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!
Cute tote bag by Nayobe Millis!

Suonatrice Pillow
Suonatrice Pillow by Tago Franceschi

Meet Coyau!

Today we have for you an interview with Coyau, who is the artist who has collaborated with us with the funny artwork of the mouse, thanks to him! Enjoy the interview!

Hi Coyau, Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?
I paint mostly as a hobby artist, but I sometimes have to produce drawings or paintings professionally.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I spend a few years doing traditional painting. And I tried digital painting, and I realized that I didn’t have to wash my brushes and would not lose my pencils or my eraser any more, and I bought a small wacom tablet (more or less 10 years ago).

 

mouse_by_coyau-d5qwt9r

 

What is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting? or Do you still prefer traditional means, if so, why?
Each technique has its advantages. History and layers make digital painting easy to erase, and that’s good if you want to try different things (it sometimes is difficult to stop trying and actually doing). Zooming is nice too (and dangerous at the same time). And I don’t lose my eraser any more. Traditional painting is more direct, you see what you get, you feel what you do (the pencil on the paper…), there is a sense of timing that I like (the time for watercolor to dry, or not completely, or not at all…). And there is no damn settings.–Nice comment–.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
I discovered open source through Wikipedia when I started contributing in 2005. I guess open source is nice when you can to code, other than that, well… I still would have to pay someone to do my coding if I wanted something done (I’ve tried asking nicely, it doesn’t always work). And often, FOSS are done by developers with smart algorithms and a lot of goodwill, but no idea of what is using the software when you need a result and you don’t have time to spend understanding what every setting means.
It’s great, though, to have free software, without having to pay a licence or to crack anything.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
I use some, but I don’t code, I don’t understand software enough to do a bug report… I sometimes talk about it to people.

How did you find out about Krita?
I discovered Krita through David Revoy and his work on Tears of Steel for the Blender Foundation.

What was your first take on it?
I got lost in the brushes settings.

What do you love about Krita?
It is a painting software where there is more than just brushes. I like all the transformation tools, the rulers, etc., they make it easy to correct a drawing without erasing (I have been taught that erasing is bad).

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
I don’t know, really. I could say that it needs hierarchy: few presets (like brushes) easy to find/use and to use and all the fine settings if you need them or if you want to refine your use of it.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
The transformation tools, and the grids are really cool on one hand and on the other, the complexity of all the brush settings and the huge number of blend modes I will likely never use.

If you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
I’ve uploaded to DeviantART my favorites (what I didn’t delete so far – I delete a lot).

What is it that you like about the mouse? What brushes did you use in it?
I’ve tried to do what I did on paper: kraft paper, “pencil_HB” (which works well), “Pencil_2B” (that looks more like black chalk), a little watercolor and white gouache for the highlights (unfortunately, I can’t find the watercolor tool, so I’ve used white “pencil_HB” instead – go figure).
Maybe I should try brush kits…

Thanks Coyau for this interview! Here you can see more of his art :)

Krita 2.7: Released!

Only 5 months after we released Krita 2.6, we release Krita 2.7 today! There are a lot of cool new features, bug fixes and improvements. Soon to come to a Linux distribution near you.

The “highlights” of Krita 2.7:

  • Rewritten and hugely improved transform tool.
  • New line smoothing method for inking.
  • Greyscale masks and selections.kritaSmoothTest

But there are more improvements:

      • Brushes: the textured painting option has been added to many brushes, the darken brush option has a larger range, faster experimental brush engine with displacement option, the bug in the healing brush is fixed and we will have a smudge mode for the filter brush.
      • Filters: HSL and colorize options are now available in tje HSV filter,  one can apply a curve to the alpha channel with Color Curves filter, a new user interface for an improved ” color to alpha” filter that makes it possible to pick colors from the canvas directly
      • Files: support for CMYK to PSD export filter, loading resolution for PSD images is fixed, it’s now possible to importing a PSD image as a layer into an existing image, QML export (exports a all the top-level layers in the Krita image as image and creates a QML file where all the images are inserted as image objects) and drag & drop of url’s.
      • Texturing: Image offset tool (for creating seamless textures to Krita).
      • Tools: you can now finally type upper-case characters in the text tool, there are improvements to the move tool. The path tools are improved: the pencil tool integrates better with Krita, shapes can be stroked with a Krita brush, fix the transformation of path strokes.
      • Canvas: the performance of the OpenGL canvas on Linux has been improved. For Krita 2.8, OpenGL comes to Windows, too.
      • Docker: new composition docker (stack can be browsed with up and down arrow; the compositions can be exported in one go).
      • Layer: new file-backed layers, improved transforming of paint and vector layers, it’s now possible to mirror all layers in an image.
      • Usability and interface:  improved zooming around cursor, two default workspaces (one for painting and one for working with vectors), now you can switch between favorite presets with left and right arrow keys and switch between current and previous shortcut with the / key, systems with multiple tablets and screens (for Cintiqs + classic tablet both connected to dual screen) now work fine, the display of marching ants around selection is improved, you can easily remove blacklisted resources from disk, you can select the most appropriate scale method, The Color button on the Krita toolbar opens the KDE color dialog which allows picking colors in other applications and selecting colors by numbers) and there’s a menu action to select all opaque pixels in a layer — check the right-click menu in the layerbox.

And after 2.7, there will be 2.8. With the new pseudo-infinite canvas and a new OpenGL canvas that also works on Windows, the flipbook docker, improved selection system, and the gradient tool will be four times faster… But first, have fun painting with Krita 2.7!

Note: the Krita Windows installers are already based on 2.8 so OpenGL support is available for Windows users.

 

In Conversation with Andreas Raninger

Today we got a chance to interview Andreas Raninger, an IT-Technician from Sweden who paints for a hobby. Even though he is working full time, he finds out time for painting and even paint book covers! Awesome, right? Read the entire conversation, here is his work “Master and Apprentice”.

 master_and_apprentice_by_endoraniendo-d5yyf17

Hi Andreas, Would you like to tell us something about yourself?
I’m living in Sweden.I’m currently working as a IT-Technician in a company called IT-Hantverkarna. Painting in my free time.

So, you paint as a hobby artist then? In any case how would you define the importance of painting in your daily life?
I’m a hobby artist but sometimes I paint book covers. I paint every moment I get the chance but when I’m working full time I seldom have the time to sit down and paint for longer sessions.

When and how did you end up trying digital painting for the first time?
I have been painting digital since the Amiga days and Deluxe paint but was never serious about it. I bought my first drawing pad five years ago but I thought that I had more control using real paint and brushes. In late 2011 I bought a Wacom Intuos 4 L and was impressed by the precision and started to do more serious work. I discovered how comfortable it was to paint digitally. I haven’t touched the oil colors after that.

An interesting look back! Now, what is it that makes you choose digital over the traditional painting?
First of all health and economy. No more thinners, dirty clothes and hands. I can work in a limited space and I don’t have buy new materials all the time. I can change my compositions and try out new ideas all the time without repainting and worry about material costs and drying time.

How did you first find out about open source communities? What is your opinion about them?
I started with Linux in 1998 and been using different distributions since then. I never cared about communities because I have always been shy with people I can’t see in front of me.

Have you worked for any FOSS project or contributed in some way?
No. Well, my main goal when uploading paintings done with Krita on Deviantart is to show others what can be done in Krita. I hope that I have contributed in that way somehow.

I think it certainly does count and it must have helped many artists new to Krita. Now, how did you find out about Krita?
I was looking for painting software that had serious tools and a humble support behind it. I changed OS to Linux and found out about Krita on the internet.

What was your first take on it?
I was pretty lost painting the first months because Krita has a lot of features. But that’s no problem, there are really helpful tutorials out there written by other artists. At first Krita was painfully slow but that has improved dramatically.

Kudos to our brilliant team on this note!
So, what do you love about Krita?
First of all, the people behind Krita. I’ve never experienced any limitations in the software when it comes to techniques. It’s all there and I can compile it with the newest code every day when I come home from work.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita? Also, anything that you really hate?
Memory efficiency is primary. Krita eats memory like crazy at a serious resolution. Adjustments should be instant like in Photoshop. When tweaking color and other things you tend to forget pretty fast how the last setting looked when you are waiting for an update of the new one.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
No strange wizards and tools, it gets the job done the way I want it. You are the painter not the program. I can grow with it and it grows with me without pushing me into corners. Krita has a soft feeling that I can’t explain. It’s has more analog feeling to it than Photoshop that feels more digital.

Guess we’re on the right track in our efforts in that case!
Well, if you had to pick one favorite of all your work done in Krita so far, what would it be?
Unlimited.

unlimited_by_endoraniendo-d6e9th4

What is it that you like about it? What brushes did you use in it?
I managed to catch the feeling and put it on screen in the way I wanted. Mostly basic brushes from the default set:
Basic Airbrush
Basic paint Shade
David Revoys Glow tool from the 2.1 brushset (Really good brushes)
And some Photohop brushes from Vincdesign that I converted to Krita.

Thank you very much Andreas for taking out time for this interview. I hope you had as much fun as I had interviewing you.
You can find more about Andreas on his deviant here.