The muses preset pack

Last time, we went through the options for the versatile and expressive hairy brushes. This time, we’ll discuss the brush set I’ve created for the “Muses” training DVD. Creating the brush set has been an enriching experience. Together with David Revoy and Timothee Giet, we created a standard for brush sets — and we have also created a SVG library with modular vector icons that are easy to adapt and use.  Check out Vasco Basque’s brush set, too.

So, without further ado: the Krita Training Vol.2: Muses Brush Set is here! The DVD is coming along nicely, too, and we hope to go into production soon.
Krita makes it really easy to create brush presets and if we don’t take care, we’ll create hundreds of presets. Managing so many presets is rather more difficult than 42, the number of presets of this pack. It pays to be selective!

This pack cover the basic necessities for the most painting projects. The set I created for  “Muses” was created made to complement the default set and also to be compatible with another packs, like David Revoy’s pack. Although both packs have some things in common, I think that they complement each other very well. Each has some functionality that isn’t present in the other.

The Muses Pack focuses on providing a rich and varied painting experience with a traditional look.

The set is designed for being used with tablet. It’s not necessary to have a tablet but I don’t recommend using a mouse because some presets can work in a unexpected ways because they use sensors like pressure or tilt. For the best experience, use a tablet that has tilt since  some presets use the “Ascension” parameter.

Contents of the set:

The colors of the squares are only for differentiating the parts,  they don’t have nothing to be with the colour coding we designed for distinguishing the presets.

Sketching:

This first part of the set covers the sketching and dry techniques phases like pencil, charcoal and hard pastel. Usually you’d use these presets in black and white, but the advantage of the digital painting is that with only one preset you can still use all the colors you want, for instance to simulate the effect of color pencils.

Digital:
This part of the set covers the most common presets that you need for digital painting. The classic round brushes with a good velocity in bigger sizes, smooth contour, squared… The illustration of below, for example, makes an extensive use of the squared brush for creating the structures of the mountain. After that, you will have to do a detailing finish, of course, but is a fast way for delimiting the contours.

Personally, I use these presets all the time

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Ink & Fx:
In principle, this presets aren’t for inking comics (for that see the presets created by Timothee Giet), they are for doing studies or fast sketches.
We can emulate the markers technique very easily.

Oils & water:
I use this presets for creating the brushstrokes of wet paint, for giving the painting the look and feel of oil paint and gouache. They create expressive effects and they are fast but I don’t recommend the using them at really big sizes: you can easily saturate the resources of even a beefy computer. They use the “ascension” sensor for the color-rate.

Blender:
This presets mix the color that is applied in the canvas. They are quite explanatory in themselves.

Texturing:
This presets are used for fill big parts of the image with varied shapes like leaves, clouds, etc. They simulate effects that will take a lot of time painting it directly with normal round brush, saving us a lot of time that can be spent on places where we need manual detailing.

Hair Brush Pack Bonus:
If you have installed “Hairy presets set” you can create brush strokes where you can see a pattern of lines that simulate the hairs of the brush. Read my first post for all the details.

Download

The brushkit ZIP can be downloaded here : http://goo.gl/j4vpft
It should be compatible with 2.7 and 2.8dev
License :  the brushkit itself and thumbnails is released under the WTFPL 2.0  (compatible with Public Domain and CC-0 ).

Install

Unzip the downloaded zip , and paste the two folders ‘brushes’ and ‘paintoppreset’ into your Krita user preference directory. Under Mint 14 KDE, the Krita pref are located here : /home/<username>/.kde/share/apps/krita/.
On Windows, it will be c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Roaming\krita or c:\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\krita.

Interview with César Tellez!

Here we are again with more interviews for you! This time we have for you a conversation with César Tellez, he is Mexican and he has been a member of our artist community for a long time and now he has collaborated with us! His artwork will appear in the new coming products of our shop. Thanks to him and enjoy the interview!

Hi César,
Do you paint professionally or as a hobby artist?

Together with some friends, we have just started making digital art professionally. And we’ve been doing comics as a hobby.

When did you start with digital painting?
About 4 years ago, when I started to be a regular user of Kubuntu. In those days I bought my first graphic tablet and I started to search for tools for working with digital art in Linux based systems.

How was your first take on it?
Well, I was used to use the programs of that famous company that makes proprietary graphics software. My first attempt was with GIMP, and getting used to it wasn’t hard. Maybe it was a little irritating to work with all the separate windows, but bit by bit I got used to ti.  Eventually I discovered MyPaint, and that was a lot easier for me in a lot of ways.

Would you prefer digital painting or traditional?
I still prefer traditional painting and if the modern publishing industry would make it possible, I would exclusively work in the traditional way. But  it is more practical,  more productive to paint digitally. Anyway,  you can obtain the same effects with both methods, so it will always depend on the circumstances of each job and on the artist in particular.

How did you get in Open Source Communities?
It was almost at the same time that I started to use free software all the time, as immediately I started to find compatibility problems, system collapses and all those lovely issues. So I understood the need to be in contact with other users via forums and blogs almost immediately.

What do you think about Open Source communities?
There are all kinds of members, as it occurs in all the communities on line, but i have always been fortunate to find very kind and cooperative people.

Did you contribute to any FOSS project?
No, this will be the first time and I do it with pleasure

MiniKampfMinimal(1)

How did you find Krita?
At the moment of experimenting with open source apps. I tried Krita since the version 1.6.3, which wasn’t usable for me, but even back then, it seemed a promising program.

How was your first take on it?
Well. 1.6.3 and 2.0 gave me huge headaches, for the slowness, crashes and the limited file format support. It was difficult, but when 2.3  was released it turned almost overnight into my favorite tool.

What is the thing you like the most about Krita?
In the first place, that is a very flexible program, its configurability makes it very convenient to adapt to the type of technique or result wanted. Then its variety of brushes is very useful, as is the fact that each painting engine has a lot of configuration options.
It is  also what I call a “direct” app: it has filters, selections and other features that are there and can be used for photo editing or general treatment of the image, but don’t disturb the work for drawing, they are there but don’t  impede the concentration when painting.

What do you think needs improvement in Krita?
Maybe its resource consumption, it’s the only thing that doesn’t allows the position of Krita in the most popular digital art apps, apart there is that limitations of using a based in Linux system or the uncomfortable thing of a dual-boot

Something you hate?
Not really, except for the sudden closures of the app, but this occurs almost only in the test versions.

In your opinion, what sets Krita apart from the other tools that you use?
Together with MyPaint, it comes closest to painting on a normal sheet of paper, it’s very comfortable with regard to its painting tools, but there are also these little options that you can find in photo editing programs that sometimes you need for working.

What brushes did you use?
I did the sketch in a paper sheet and then scanned it. The coloring process was done with pixel brushes with the maximum opacity, to make easier the application of color (task that regularly I start for solid colors with the fill tool). For the lights and shadows i used the blur brush, sometimes with textures, that, i have to say, that is a very interesting tool that Krita offers.

Thank you so much for this interview César, has been a pleasure 🙂

Hope you all enjoyed it!